Social Exchange in Research: Toward a “New Deal”

Thomas A. Leitko, Steven Ames Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper calls for the enfranchisement of respondents into research decision making. Respondent participation is one way to overcome respondent posturing to control information. Respondent posturing is produced when researchers create an unbalanced exchange where respondents have no motivation to participate, or when, through their use of rewards, researchers change the rules of the game. Typical researcher-respondent relations are explored in relation to respondent posturing, and the problems and prospects of using respondent participation to create a more open and productive research relationship are examined. We conclude by pointing to respondent relations as an area in which social researchers need to be trained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-462
Number of pages16
JournalThe Journal of Applied Behavioral Science
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1982

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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