Social influence: The role of self-monitoring when making social comparisons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The self-monitoring construct (Snyder, 1987) may prove to be useful when examining who individuals choose when making social comparisons. In Study 1, the self-monitoring propensity of individuals who provide social comparison information and the self-monitoring propensity of individuals who use such information were examined. Results supported the hypothesis that high self-monitors have advisors (i.e., individuals to whom they first turn for advice) that are high in self-monitoring, whereas low self-monitors have advisors that are low in self-monitoring. In Study 2, high and low self-monitors identified their advisors as experts and generalists. Results supported the hypothesis that high self-monitors have more expert advisors than low self-monitors. The findings are discussed in terms of the implications for consumer decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-973
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

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