Social Referencing Gaze Behavior During a Videogame Task: Eye Tracking Evidence from Children With and Without ASD

Erinn Heer Finke, Krista M. Wilkinson, Benjamin D. Hickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand the social referencing behaviors of children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while visually attending to a videogame stimulus depicting both the face of the videogame player and the videogame play action. Videogames appear to offer a uniquely well-suited environment for the emergence of friendships, but it is not known if children with and without ASD attend to and play videogames similarly. Eyetracking technology was used to investigate visual attention of participants matched based on chronological age. Parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were used and results indicated the groups did not differ on percentage of time spent visually attending to any of the areas of interest, with one possible exception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-423
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Child Behavior
Technology
Autism Spectrum Disorder

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Social Referencing Gaze Behavior During a Videogame Task : Eye Tracking Evidence from Children With and Without ASD. / Finke, Erinn Heer; Wilkinson, Krista M.; Hickerson, Benjamin D.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 415-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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