Social Revolution, the State, and War: How Revolutions Affect War-Making Capacity and Interstate War Outcomes

Jeff Carter, Michael Bernhard, Glenn Palmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Democracy has been the primary focus of our efforts to understand the impact of domestic institutions on processes of international conflict. In this article, we examine how a particular nondemocratic regime type, postrevolutionary states, affects military capabilities and war outcomes. Drawing on scholarship that conceptualizes revolutions as a unique class of modernizing events that result in stronger state structures, we argue that postrevolutionary states should be better able to mobilize populations and economic resources for military purposes. Tests performed on a comprehensive sample of twentieth-century states and interstate wars confirm our predictions: postrevolutionary states have larger, better funded militaries and achieve more successful war outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-466
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Conflict Resolution
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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