Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum

Moira Burke, Robert Kraut, Diane L. Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The defining characteristics of autism, including difficulty with nonverbal cues and need for structure, and the defining characteristics of computer-mediated communication (CMC), including reduction of extraneous cues and structured exchange, suggest the two would be an ideal match. Interviews and observations of 16 adults on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum reveal that many seek greater social connectedness and take advantage of interest-based online communities to foster successful, supportive relationships. However, CMC intensifies problems of trust, disclosure, inflexible thinking, and perspective-taking, making it difficult for some to maintain relationships. Interventions in the form of information visualization and CMC-specific social skills training are presented. Intervention considerations and participatory design opportunities are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010
Pages425-434
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2010
Event2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010 - Savannah, GA, United States
Duration: Feb 6 2010Feb 10 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW

Other

Other2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySavannah, GA
Period2/6/102/10/10

Fingerprint

Communication
Ion exchange
Visualization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Burke, M., Kraut, R., & Williams, D. L. (2010). Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum. In 2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010 (pp. 425-434). (Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW). https://doi.org/10.1145/1718918.1718991
Burke, Moira ; Kraut, Robert ; Williams, Diane L. / Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum. 2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010. 2010. pp. 425-434 (Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW).
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Burke, M, Kraut, R & Williams, DL 2010, Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum. in 2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, pp. 425-434, 2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010, Savannah, GA, United States, 2/6/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1718918.1718991

Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum. / Burke, Moira; Kraut, Robert; Williams, Diane L.

2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010. 2010. p. 425-434 (Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Burke M, Kraut R, Williams DL. Social use of computer-mediated communication by adults on the autism spectrum. In 2010 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2010. 2010. p. 425-434. (Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW). https://doi.org/10.1145/1718918.1718991