Socio-Demographic Determinants of Language Transition among the Children of French- and Spanish-Caribbean Immigrants in the US

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, language transition among the children of Caribbean immigrants in the US is examined from two main perspectives. First, speeds of language transition among children in French- and Spanish-Caribbean immigrant families are compared. Second, the mediating roles of socio-demographic factors and sibling characteristics in language transition are also examined. The results reveal that, with increasing assimilation, children in French-Caribbean families experience a faster transition to English monolingualism than their counterparts with Spanish-Caribbean parents. Transition to English monolingualism is also negatively associated with the number of firstgeneration siblings within a household. However, increases in the number of second- and first-generation monolingual-English siblings significantly shift childrens language use towards complete Anglicisation. Instructively, this impact offsets the influence which ethnically endogamous parents have on the retention of the mother-tongue within immigrant families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-559
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

Fingerprint

immigrant
determinants
language
parents
mother tongue
first generation
demographic factors
assimilation
Immigrants
French Caribbean
Demographics
Language
experience
Siblings
Monolingualism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{20345c53f625426e922aabd5ce02f44a,
title = "Socio-Demographic Determinants of Language Transition among the Children of French- and Spanish-Caribbean Immigrants in the US",
abstract = "In this study, language transition among the children of Caribbean immigrants in the US is examined from two main perspectives. First, speeds of language transition among children in French- and Spanish-Caribbean immigrant families are compared. Second, the mediating roles of socio-demographic factors and sibling characteristics in language transition are also examined. The results reveal that, with increasing assimilation, children in French-Caribbean families experience a faster transition to English monolingualism than their counterparts with Spanish-Caribbean parents. Transition to English monolingualism is also negatively associated with the number of firstgeneration siblings within a household. However, increases in the number of second- and first-generation monolingual-English siblings significantly shift childrens language use towards complete Anglicisation. Instructively, this impact offsets the influence which ethnically endogamous parents have on the retention of the mother-tongue within immigrant families.",
author = "Thomas, {Kevin J.A.}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/1369183X.2011.545270",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "543--559",
journal = "Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies",
issn = "1369-183X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socio-Demographic Determinants of Language Transition among the Children of French- and Spanish-Caribbean Immigrants in the US

AU - Thomas, Kevin J.A.

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - In this study, language transition among the children of Caribbean immigrants in the US is examined from two main perspectives. First, speeds of language transition among children in French- and Spanish-Caribbean immigrant families are compared. Second, the mediating roles of socio-demographic factors and sibling characteristics in language transition are also examined. The results reveal that, with increasing assimilation, children in French-Caribbean families experience a faster transition to English monolingualism than their counterparts with Spanish-Caribbean parents. Transition to English monolingualism is also negatively associated with the number of firstgeneration siblings within a household. However, increases in the number of second- and first-generation monolingual-English siblings significantly shift childrens language use towards complete Anglicisation. Instructively, this impact offsets the influence which ethnically endogamous parents have on the retention of the mother-tongue within immigrant families.

AB - In this study, language transition among the children of Caribbean immigrants in the US is examined from two main perspectives. First, speeds of language transition among children in French- and Spanish-Caribbean immigrant families are compared. Second, the mediating roles of socio-demographic factors and sibling characteristics in language transition are also examined. The results reveal that, with increasing assimilation, children in French-Caribbean families experience a faster transition to English monolingualism than their counterparts with Spanish-Caribbean parents. Transition to English monolingualism is also negatively associated with the number of firstgeneration siblings within a household. However, increases in the number of second- and first-generation monolingual-English siblings significantly shift childrens language use towards complete Anglicisation. Instructively, this impact offsets the influence which ethnically endogamous parents have on the retention of the mother-tongue within immigrant families.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952499239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952499239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1369183X.2011.545270

DO - 10.1080/1369183X.2011.545270

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:79952499239

VL - 37

SP - 543

EP - 559

JO - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

JF - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

SN - 1369-183X

IS - 4

ER -