Sociodemographics and access to organic and local food: A case study of New Orleans, Louisiana

Chuo Li, Amir Ghiasi, Xiaopeng Li, Guangqing Chi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between physical accessibility to organic and local food, and sociodemographic factors in New Orleans, Louisiana. Spatial regression models were used to investigate how sociodemographic variables such as income, race/ethnicity, education, and age correlate with driving, bicycling, and walking distances to stores that sell organic or local food. The distances were calculated from GIS and real-time speed information from Google Maps. The results indicated that physical access to such stores is positively associated with population density, median housing value, education, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanics, and is negatively associated with median housing age. We found no disparities in access to organic and local food on the basis of income and race.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-150
Number of pages10
JournalCities
Volume79
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

food
housing
income
education
sociodemographic factors
ethnicity
population density
walking
accessibility
search engine
Geographical Information System
GIS
regression
Organic food
Local food
Values
Median
Income
Education
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

Cite this

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title = "Sociodemographics and access to organic and local food: A case study of New Orleans, Louisiana",
abstract = "This study examined the association between physical accessibility to organic and local food, and sociodemographic factors in New Orleans, Louisiana. Spatial regression models were used to investigate how sociodemographic variables such as income, race/ethnicity, education, and age correlate with driving, bicycling, and walking distances to stores that sell organic or local food. The distances were calculated from GIS and real-time speed information from Google Maps. The results indicated that physical access to such stores is positively associated with population density, median housing value, education, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanics, and is negatively associated with median housing age. We found no disparities in access to organic and local food on the basis of income and race.",
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Sociodemographics and access to organic and local food : A case study of New Orleans, Louisiana. / Li, Chuo; Ghiasi, Amir; Li, Xiaopeng; Chi, Guangqing.

In: Cities, Vol. 79, 01.09.2018, p. 141-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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