Socioeconomic obstacles to establishing a participatory plant breeding program for organic growers in the United States

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proponents of participatory plant breeding (PPB) contend that it is more conducive to promoting agricultural biodiversity than conventional plant breeding. The argument is that conventional plant breeding tends to produce crops for homogenous environments, while PPB tends to be directed at meeting the diverse environmental conditions of the farmers participating in a breeding program. Social scientific research is needed to highlight the complex socioeconomic factors that inhibit efforts to initiate PPB programs. To contribute, we offer a case study of a participatory organic seed production project that involved a university breeding program, commercial organic seed dealers, and organic farmers in the Northeastern United States. We demonstrate that, although PPB may indeed promote agricultural biodiversity, several socioeconomic obstacles must be overcome to establish such a program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-91
Number of pages19
JournalSustainability
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

plant breeding
Biodiversity
Seed
biodiversity
Crops
farmer
socioeconomic factors
breeding
environmental factors
seed production
programme
socioeconomics
university
environmental conditions
seed
crop

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

@article{e5f79da2df3b455da7708bcab5a46a99,
title = "Socioeconomic obstacles to establishing a participatory plant breeding program for organic growers in the United States",
abstract = "Proponents of participatory plant breeding (PPB) contend that it is more conducive to promoting agricultural biodiversity than conventional plant breeding. The argument is that conventional plant breeding tends to produce crops for homogenous environments, while PPB tends to be directed at meeting the diverse environmental conditions of the farmers participating in a breeding program. Social scientific research is needed to highlight the complex socioeconomic factors that inhibit efforts to initiate PPB programs. To contribute, we offer a case study of a participatory organic seed production project that involved a university breeding program, commercial organic seed dealers, and organic farmers in the Northeastern United States. We demonstrate that, although PPB may indeed promote agricultural biodiversity, several socioeconomic obstacles must be overcome to establish such a program.",
author = "Ruth Mendum and Glenna, {Leland L.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3390/su2010073",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "73--91",
journal = "Sustainability",
issn = "2071-1050",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic obstacles to establishing a participatory plant breeding program for organic growers in the United States

AU - Mendum, Ruth

AU - Glenna, Leland L.

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - Proponents of participatory plant breeding (PPB) contend that it is more conducive to promoting agricultural biodiversity than conventional plant breeding. The argument is that conventional plant breeding tends to produce crops for homogenous environments, while PPB tends to be directed at meeting the diverse environmental conditions of the farmers participating in a breeding program. Social scientific research is needed to highlight the complex socioeconomic factors that inhibit efforts to initiate PPB programs. To contribute, we offer a case study of a participatory organic seed production project that involved a university breeding program, commercial organic seed dealers, and organic farmers in the Northeastern United States. We demonstrate that, although PPB may indeed promote agricultural biodiversity, several socioeconomic obstacles must be overcome to establish such a program.

AB - Proponents of participatory plant breeding (PPB) contend that it is more conducive to promoting agricultural biodiversity than conventional plant breeding. The argument is that conventional plant breeding tends to produce crops for homogenous environments, while PPB tends to be directed at meeting the diverse environmental conditions of the farmers participating in a breeding program. Social scientific research is needed to highlight the complex socioeconomic factors that inhibit efforts to initiate PPB programs. To contribute, we offer a case study of a participatory organic seed production project that involved a university breeding program, commercial organic seed dealers, and organic farmers in the Northeastern United States. We demonstrate that, although PPB may indeed promote agricultural biodiversity, several socioeconomic obstacles must be overcome to establish such a program.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952425911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77952425911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/su2010073

DO - 10.3390/su2010073

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77952425911

VL - 2

SP - 73

EP - 91

JO - Sustainability

JF - Sustainability

SN - 2071-1050

IS - 1

ER -