Socioeconomic Resource Environments in Biological and Alternative Family Care and Children's Cognitive Performance*

Sarah Font, Marina H. Potter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined social and economic resources in the environments of children involved with child protective services and their associations with children's cognitive performance. We used a national dataset of child protection investigations (children aged 6–16 at Wave 1). Using latent class analysis, we constructed profiles of the financial resources, parental education and employment, and family structure and size. We then examined within- and across-time associations between resource environment profiles and children's math and reading scores and tested whether associations differed by family care type. Our latent class analysis identified four distinct family resource environments: educated middle class, single earner, large working class, and severely disadvantaged. Family resource environment profiles predicted current cognitive performance and changes in performance over time, but associations were more consistent for children in biological family care. Children who remain in home following maltreatment allegations may benefit from services that target social as well as economic resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-287
Number of pages25
JournalSociological Inquiry
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

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resources
performance
employment structure
child protection
family size
maltreatment
family structure
working class
middle class
economics
education
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Socioeconomic Resource Environments in Biological and Alternative Family Care and Children's Cognitive Performance*. / Font, Sarah; Potter, Marina H.

In: Sociological Inquiry, Vol. 89, No. 2, 05.2019, p. 263-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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