Soil bulk density changes caused by mechanized harvesting: A case study in central Appalachia

Jingxin Wang, Chris B. Ledoux, Pam Edwards, Mark Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A mechanized harvesting system consisting of a feller-buncher and a grapple skidder was examined to quantify soil bulk density changes in a central Appalachian hardwood forest site. Soil bulk density was measured using a nuclear gauge pre-harvest and post-harvest systematically across the harvest unit and on transects across skid trails. Bulk density also was measured in the skid trails in a subset of the transects after the first 10 loaded machine passes. Post-harvest soil bulk density of 954.4 kg/m 3 was not significantly different from the pre-harvest bulk density of 925.2 kg/m 3 across the site. Grapple skidding resulted in significant bulk density changes in the skid trails. Results suggest that most of the soil bulk density changes in the skid trails occurred after the first loaded machine pass. Our findings suggest that the use of tracked feller-bunchers to fell and bunch the trees results in the minimum changes to soil bulk density across a harvest site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9864
Pages (from-to)37-40
Number of pages4
JournalForest Products Journal
Volume55
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Plant Science

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