Soil erosion and labor shortages in the Andes with special reference to Bolivia, 1953ndash;1991: Implications for "conservation-with-development"

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Abstract

Many claims in support of soil conservation policies have been flawed by excessively deterministic reasoning and unwarranted spatial overaggregation. A case study remedying these flaws demonstrates that soil erosion in the Bolivian Andes worsened during recent decades (1953-91) due to changes in production as peasants shifted labor from conservation techniques to nonfarm employment. These findings reflect in three policy issues concerning sustainable resource management oriented toward development ("conservation-with-development") are discussed: (a)environmental consequences and economic causes of increased nonfarm employment by part-time peasant farmers; (b) environment-related aspects of technology innovation and technique modifications in labor-scarce peasant production; and (c) the environmental perceptions of peasant farmers in participatory development planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1659-1675
Number of pages17
JournalWorld Development
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Bolivia
peasant
shortage
soil erosion
erosion
labor
conservation
environmental economics
soil conservation
resource management
farmer
innovation
development planning
cause
Soil erosion
Peasants
Conservation
Labor shortage
Andes
management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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