Soil silicon amendment for managing gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses in Pennsylvania

U. N. Nanayakkara, Wakar Uddin, L. E. Datnoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gray leaf spot (Magnaporthe oryzae) of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is commonly managed by fungicide applications. With increasing public concerns over chemical usage and emergence of fungicide-resistant pathogen populations, the golf course industry seeks disease management through integrated management practices. Silicon (Si) amendments have been proven effective in controlling fungal diseases of various crops including turfgrasses. This study investigated the effects of Si applications on gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on commercial golf courses. Silicon sources wollastonite and calcium silicate slag were applied at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 t/ha at two golf courses in Pennsylvania with different soil types: an Ultisol and an Alfisol. The turf was inoculated with M. oryzae 10 weeks after silicon application, and disease development was monitored over a 10 week period. Results showed that area under the disease progress curve and final disease severity 10 weeks after inoculation were significantly reduced by Si applications at both sites. The magnitude of disease reduction was greater in the perennial ryegrass turf grown on the Ultisol. Tissue Si content increased with increasing rates of calcium silicate at both sites. Leaf tissue content of other macro- and micro-nutrients did not change when Si was applied at either site. Soil analysis showed that soil Si and pH increased with increasing rates of Si at both sites. These findings suggest that Si applications can reduce gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses and may prove to be of use in the integrated management of turfgrass diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-426
Number of pages12
JournalCanadian Journal of Plant Pathology
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

leaf spot
golf courses
lawns and turf
silicon
Lolium perenne
soil
calcium silicate
Magnaporthe oryzae
Ultisols
turf management
slags
Alfisols
nutrients
turf grasses
soil analysis
disease severity
pesticide application
soil types
fungicides
disease control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

@article{160ad8087496410aaadc354b5727cdb9,
title = "Soil silicon amendment for managing gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses in Pennsylvania",
abstract = "Gray leaf spot (Magnaporthe oryzae) of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is commonly managed by fungicide applications. With increasing public concerns over chemical usage and emergence of fungicide-resistant pathogen populations, the golf course industry seeks disease management through integrated management practices. Silicon (Si) amendments have been proven effective in controlling fungal diseases of various crops including turfgrasses. This study investigated the effects of Si applications on gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on commercial golf courses. Silicon sources wollastonite and calcium silicate slag were applied at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 t/ha at two golf courses in Pennsylvania with different soil types: an Ultisol and an Alfisol. The turf was inoculated with M. oryzae 10 weeks after silicon application, and disease development was monitored over a 10 week period. Results showed that area under the disease progress curve and final disease severity 10 weeks after inoculation were significantly reduced by Si applications at both sites. The magnitude of disease reduction was greater in the perennial ryegrass turf grown on the Ultisol. Tissue Si content increased with increasing rates of calcium silicate at both sites. Leaf tissue content of other macro- and micro-nutrients did not change when Si was applied at either site. Soil analysis showed that soil Si and pH increased with increasing rates of Si at both sites. These findings suggest that Si applications can reduce gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses and may prove to be of use in the integrated management of turfgrass diseases.",
author = "Nanayakkara, {U. N.} and Wakar Uddin and Datnoff, {L. E.}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/07060660909507616",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "415--426",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology",
issn = "0706-0661",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

Soil silicon amendment for managing gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses in Pennsylvania. / Nanayakkara, U. N.; Uddin, Wakar; Datnoff, L. E.

In: Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 415-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Soil silicon amendment for managing gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses in Pennsylvania

AU - Nanayakkara, U. N.

AU - Uddin, Wakar

AU - Datnoff, L. E.

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Gray leaf spot (Magnaporthe oryzae) of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is commonly managed by fungicide applications. With increasing public concerns over chemical usage and emergence of fungicide-resistant pathogen populations, the golf course industry seeks disease management through integrated management practices. Silicon (Si) amendments have been proven effective in controlling fungal diseases of various crops including turfgrasses. This study investigated the effects of Si applications on gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on commercial golf courses. Silicon sources wollastonite and calcium silicate slag were applied at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 t/ha at two golf courses in Pennsylvania with different soil types: an Ultisol and an Alfisol. The turf was inoculated with M. oryzae 10 weeks after silicon application, and disease development was monitored over a 10 week period. Results showed that area under the disease progress curve and final disease severity 10 weeks after inoculation were significantly reduced by Si applications at both sites. The magnitude of disease reduction was greater in the perennial ryegrass turf grown on the Ultisol. Tissue Si content increased with increasing rates of calcium silicate at both sites. Leaf tissue content of other macro- and micro-nutrients did not change when Si was applied at either site. Soil analysis showed that soil Si and pH increased with increasing rates of Si at both sites. These findings suggest that Si applications can reduce gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses and may prove to be of use in the integrated management of turfgrass diseases.

AB - Gray leaf spot (Magnaporthe oryzae) of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is commonly managed by fungicide applications. With increasing public concerns over chemical usage and emergence of fungicide-resistant pathogen populations, the golf course industry seeks disease management through integrated management practices. Silicon (Si) amendments have been proven effective in controlling fungal diseases of various crops including turfgrasses. This study investigated the effects of Si applications on gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on commercial golf courses. Silicon sources wollastonite and calcium silicate slag were applied at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 t/ha at two golf courses in Pennsylvania with different soil types: an Ultisol and an Alfisol. The turf was inoculated with M. oryzae 10 weeks after silicon application, and disease development was monitored over a 10 week period. Results showed that area under the disease progress curve and final disease severity 10 weeks after inoculation were significantly reduced by Si applications at both sites. The magnitude of disease reduction was greater in the perennial ryegrass turf grown on the Ultisol. Tissue Si content increased with increasing rates of calcium silicate at both sites. Leaf tissue content of other macro- and micro-nutrients did not change when Si was applied at either site. Soil analysis showed that soil Si and pH increased with increasing rates of Si at both sites. These findings suggest that Si applications can reduce gray leaf spot development on perennial ryegrass turf on golf courses and may prove to be of use in the integrated management of turfgrass diseases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955914233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955914233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07060660909507616

DO - 10.1080/07060660909507616

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 415

EP - 426

JO - Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology

JF - Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology

SN - 0706-0661

IS - 4

ER -