Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The orientation of housing estates in relationship to the sun?s position has been an important topic throughout architectural history. While the vast majority of studies have stated that the best housing orientation is facing the building?s long side toward the south, most architects and urban planners of the 1920s preferred that the building?s long sides be oriented to face east and west. This paper analyzes when this movement came to the fore and why architects of High Modernism, such as Walter Gropius and Otto Haesler, among others, decided against a building orientation that has been favored throughout history, including today. It will discuss the modernist arguments for east and west orientation, including their contemporary counterarguments, which are echoed in today?s discourse of south orientation in housing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons
Subtitle of host publicationShaping the New Energy Economy
PublisherAmerican Solar Energy Society
Pages47-54
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781510820692
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - University Park, United States
Duration: Jul 28 2015Jul 30 2015

Publication series

Name44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy

Other

Other44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015
CountryUnited States
CityUniversity Park
Period7/28/157/30/15

Fingerprint

Solar buildings
Sun

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Poerschke, U. (2015). Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing. In 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy (pp. 47-54). (44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy). American Solar Energy Society.
Poerschke, Ute. / Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing. 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy. American Solar Energy Society, 2015. pp. 47-54 (44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy).
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Poerschke, U 2015, Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing. in 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy. 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy, American Solar Energy Society, pp. 47-54, 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015, University Park, United States, 7/28/15.

Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing. / Poerschke, Ute.

44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy. American Solar Energy Society, 2015. p. 47-54 (44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Poerschke U. Solar buildings in the 1920s the discourse on best sun orientation in modern housing. In 44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy. American Solar Energy Society. 2015. p. 47-54. (44th ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR 2015 - Expanding Horizons: Shaping the New Energy Economy).