Solidarity and drug use in the electronic dance music scene

Philip R. Kavanaugh, Tammy L. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current research and theory on rave culture has articulated a link between solidarity and drug use, although the precise nature of this relationship remains unclear. Work conducted in the field of cultural studies contends that while rave participants engage in drug use, it is by no means the exclusive source of solidarity. However, work in the fields of public health and medical science portrays rave culture as a site of extensive drug consumption and personal risk, where solidarity is dismissed or dubiously acknowledged as chemically induced. Prior research has not sought to reconcile this tension, or to consider how the relationship between drug use and solidarity may have changed over time. Using data from a multimethod ethnography of the rave scene in Philadelphia, we found the drug use-solidarity relationship substantially more complicated than prior scholarship has articulated. Our discoveries, consequently, provide clarification of this relationship as well as advance the literatures on solidarity, collective identity, youth culture, and music scenes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-208
Number of pages28
JournalSociological Quarterly
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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