Soluble starch synthases and starch branching enzymes from cotyledons of smooth- and wrinkled-seeded lines of Pisum sativum L.

Gail L. Matters, Charles D. Boyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Soluble starch synthase and branching enzyme were purified from 18-day-old cotyledons of the smooth-seeded pea cultivar Alaska (RR) and wrinkled-seeded pea cultivar Progress #9 (rr) by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Two coeluting peaks of primed and citrate-stimulated starch synthase activity and a major and minor peak of branching enzyme activity were observed in Alaska. However, in Progress #9, only one peak of synthase activity was found. When crude extracts of Progress #9 were centrifuged, over 70% of the starch synthase activity was recovered in the pelleted fraction, and additional washings of the pellet released no further activity. The addition of purified starch granules to Alaska crude extracts also resulted in the recovery of a greater proportion of synthase activity in pelleted fractions. The two peaks of branching enzyme activity in Alaska differed in their stimulation of phosphorylase, amylose branching activity, and activity in various buffers. The DEAE-cellulose profile of Progress #9 showed no distinct peak of branching enzyme and less than 10% of the total activity found in Alaska. The association of one form of soluble starch synthase with the pelleted fraction and the greatly reduced levels of branching enzyme provide a partial explanation for the appearance of high-amylose starch in Progress #9 cotyledons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-848
Number of pages16
JournalBiochemical Genetics
Volume20
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1982

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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