Some insights into micro-EHL pressures

N. Fang, Liming Chang, G. J. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

An analytical model is developed in this paper which relates the major component of micro-EHL pressure responses to lubricant properties, roughness geometry, contact load, velocity, and slide-to-roll ratio. Analyses are then conducted showing the effects of system parameters on this micro-EHL pressure. For a Newtonian lubricant with an exponential pressure-viscosity law, this pressure would be large unless the contact practically operates right at pure rolling. The magnitude of the pressure rippling is largely independent of the slide-to-roll ratio, and smaller wavelength components of the surface roughness generate larger micro-EHL pressures. With less dramatic pressure-viscosity enhancement such as the two-slope model, the micro-EHL pressure is generally smaller and sensitive to the slide-to-roll ratio, larger with higher sliding in the contact. Furthermore, this pressure-viscosity model yields a micro-EHL pressure that becomes vanishingly small corresponding to sufficiently small wavelength components of the roughness. For a shear-thinning non-Newtonian lubricant, such as the Eyring model, with an exponential pressure-viscosity law, substantially less micro-EHL pressure rippling is generally developed than its Newtonian counterpart. While the pressure rippling is insensitive of the slide-to-roll ratio like its Newtonian counterpart, it vanishes corresponding to sufficiently small wavelength components of the roughness. The analyses revealed that a key factor resulting in a smaller micro-EHL pressure with the two-slope model or the Eyring model is the lower viscosity or shear-thinned effective viscosity in the loaded region of the contact. Since EHL traction is proportional to this viscosity, contacts lubricated with oils exhibiting higher traction behavior would develop larger micro-EHL pressures and thus would be more vulnerable to fatigue failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper)
Issue number98 -TRIB-1-61
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 ASME/STLE Joint Tribology Conference - Toronto, Can
Duration: Oct 25 1998Oct 29 1998

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Viscosity
Surface roughness
Lubricants
Wavelength
Shear thinning
Analytical models
Fatigue of materials
Geometry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Fang, N., Chang, L., & Johnston, G. J. (1998). Some insights into micro-EHL pressures. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper), (98 -TRIB-1-61), 1-8.
Fang, N. ; Chang, Liming ; Johnston, G. J. / Some insights into micro-EHL pressures. In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper). 1998 ; No. 98 -TRIB-1-61. pp. 1-8.
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Fang, N, Chang, L & Johnston, GJ 1998, 'Some insights into micro-EHL pressures', American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper), no. 98 -TRIB-1-61, pp. 1-8.

Some insights into micro-EHL pressures. / Fang, N.; Chang, Liming; Johnston, G. J.

In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper), No. 98 -TRIB-1-61, 01.12.1998, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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Fang N, Chang L, Johnston GJ. Some insights into micro-EHL pressures. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Paper). 1998 Dec 1;(98 -TRIB-1-61):1-8.