Source cues in online news

Is the proximate source more powerful than distal sources?

Hyunjin Kang, Keunmin Bae, Shaoke Zhang, S. Shyam Sundar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the rise of intermediaries such as portals, social-bookmarking sites, and microblogs, online news is often carried through multiple sources. However, the perceived credibility of different source cues attached to a single news story can be quite different. So, how do readers evaluate the story? Do users factor in all distal sources, or do they simply refer to the proximate source delivering the news? Using a 2 (involvement) x 2 (proximal source credibility) x 2 (distal source credibility) full-factorial between-subjects experiment (N = 231), we found that while highly involved readers considered both types of sources, low-involvement readers were primarily influenced by the proximate source.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-736
Number of pages18
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume88
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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credibility
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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Source cues in online news : Is the proximate source more powerful than distal sources? / Kang, Hyunjin; Bae, Keunmin; Zhang, Shaoke; Sundar, S. Shyam.

In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 88, No. 4, 01.01.2011, p. 719-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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