Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging: cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume

David J. Madden, Emily L. Parks, Catherine W. Tallman, Maria A. Boylan, David A. Hoagey, Sally B. Cocjin, Lauren E. Packard, Micah A. Johnson, Ying hui Chou, Guy G. Potter, Nan kuei Chen, Rachel E. Siciliano, Zachary A. Monge, Jesse A. Honig, Michele T. Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Age-related decline in fluid cognition can be characterized as a disconnection among specific brain structures, leading to a decline in functional efficiency. The potential sources of disconnection, however, are unclear. We investigated imaging measures of cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume as mediators of the relation between age and fluid cognition, in 145 healthy, community-dwelling adults 19–79 years of age. At a general level of analysis, with a single composite measure of fluid cognition and single measures of each of the 3 imaging modalities, age exhibited an independent influence on the cognitive and imaging measures, and the imaging variables did not mediate the age-cognition relation. At a more specific level of analysis, resting-state functional connectivity of sensorimotor networks was a significant mediator of the age-related decline in executive function. These findings suggest that different levels of analysis lead to different models of neurocognitive disconnection, and that resting-state functional connectivity, in particular, may contribute to age-related decline in executive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-213
Number of pages15
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume54
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Cognition
Executive Function
Independent Living
White Matter
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Madden, David J. ; Parks, Emily L. ; Tallman, Catherine W. ; Boylan, Maria A. ; Hoagey, David A. ; Cocjin, Sally B. ; Packard, Lauren E. ; Johnson, Micah A. ; Chou, Ying hui ; Potter, Guy G. ; Chen, Nan kuei ; Siciliano, Rachel E. ; Monge, Zachary A. ; Honig, Jesse A. ; Diaz, Michele T. / Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging : cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 2017 ; Vol. 54. pp. 199-213.
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abstract = "Age-related decline in fluid cognition can be characterized as a disconnection among specific brain structures, leading to a decline in functional efficiency. The potential sources of disconnection, however, are unclear. We investigated imaging measures of cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume as mediators of the relation between age and fluid cognition, in 145 healthy, community-dwelling adults 19–79 years of age. At a general level of analysis, with a single composite measure of fluid cognition and single measures of each of the 3 imaging modalities, age exhibited an independent influence on the cognitive and imaging measures, and the imaging variables did not mediate the age-cognition relation. At a more specific level of analysis, resting-state functional connectivity of sensorimotor networks was a significant mediator of the age-related decline in executive function. These findings suggest that different levels of analysis lead to different models of neurocognitive disconnection, and that resting-state functional connectivity, in particular, may contribute to age-related decline in executive function.",
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Madden, DJ, Parks, EL, Tallman, CW, Boylan, MA, Hoagey, DA, Cocjin, SB, Packard, LE, Johnson, MA, Chou, YH, Potter, GG, Chen, NK, Siciliano, RE, Monge, ZA, Honig, JA & Diaz, MT 2017, 'Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging: cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume', Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 54, pp. 199-213. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.01.027

Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging : cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume. / Madden, David J.; Parks, Emily L.; Tallman, Catherine W.; Boylan, Maria A.; Hoagey, David A.; Cocjin, Sally B.; Packard, Lauren E.; Johnson, Micah A.; Chou, Ying hui; Potter, Guy G.; Chen, Nan kuei; Siciliano, Rachel E.; Monge, Zachary A.; Honig, Jesse A.; Diaz, Michele T.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 54, 01.06.2017, p. 199-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging

T2 - cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume

AU - Madden, David J.

AU - Parks, Emily L.

AU - Tallman, Catherine W.

AU - Boylan, Maria A.

AU - Hoagey, David A.

AU - Cocjin, Sally B.

AU - Packard, Lauren E.

AU - Johnson, Micah A.

AU - Chou, Ying hui

AU - Potter, Guy G.

AU - Chen, Nan kuei

AU - Siciliano, Rachel E.

AU - Monge, Zachary A.

AU - Honig, Jesse A.

AU - Diaz, Michele T.

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Age-related decline in fluid cognition can be characterized as a disconnection among specific brain structures, leading to a decline in functional efficiency. The potential sources of disconnection, however, are unclear. We investigated imaging measures of cerebral white-matter integrity, resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity volume as mediators of the relation between age and fluid cognition, in 145 healthy, community-dwelling adults 19–79 years of age. At a general level of analysis, with a single composite measure of fluid cognition and single measures of each of the 3 imaging modalities, age exhibited an independent influence on the cognitive and imaging measures, and the imaging variables did not mediate the age-cognition relation. At a more specific level of analysis, resting-state functional connectivity of sensorimotor networks was a significant mediator of the age-related decline in executive function. These findings suggest that different levels of analysis lead to different models of neurocognitive disconnection, and that resting-state functional connectivity, in particular, may contribute to age-related decline in executive function.

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