South African-ness among adolescents: The emergence of a collective identity within the birth to twenty cohort study

Shane A. Norris, Robert W. Roeser, Linda M. Richter, Nina Lewin, Carren Ginsburg, Stella A. Fleetwood, Elizabeth Taole, Kees Van Der Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors assessed the emergence of a South African identity among Black, Colored (mixed ancestral origin), White (predominantly English speaking), and Indian adolescents participating in a birth cohort study called "Birth to Twenty" in Johannesburg, South Africa. They examined young people's certainty of their self-categorization as South African; the centrality of their personal, racial, linguistic, and South African identities in their self-definition; and their perceptions of South African life and society today. These results reflect a historical opportunity for full citizenship and national enfranchisement that the end of apartheid heralded for Black and Colored individuals. Black and Colored youth tend to be more certain about their South African-ness, have a more collective identity, and have a more positive perception around South Africa. In contrast, White and Indian youth are less certain about their South African-ness, have a more individualistic identity, and have a less positive perception about South Africa today.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-69
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Fingerprint

collective identity
South Africa
Cohort Studies
Parturition
adolescent
Linguistics
apartheid
speaking
citizenship
linguistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Norris, Shane A. ; Roeser, Robert W. ; Richter, Linda M. ; Lewin, Nina ; Ginsburg, Carren ; Fleetwood, Stella A. ; Taole, Elizabeth ; Van Der Wolf, Kees. / South African-ness among adolescents : The emergence of a collective identity within the birth to twenty cohort study. In: Journal of Early Adolescence. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 51-69.
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South African-ness among adolescents : The emergence of a collective identity within the birth to twenty cohort study. / Norris, Shane A.; Roeser, Robert W.; Richter, Linda M.; Lewin, Nina; Ginsburg, Carren; Fleetwood, Stella A.; Taole, Elizabeth; Van Der Wolf, Kees.

In: Journal of Early Adolescence, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.02.2008, p. 51-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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