Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in Brook Trout Density

Implications for Population Monitoring

Tyler Wagner, Jefferson T. Deweber, Jason Detar, David Kristine, John A. Sweka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many potential stressors to aquatic environments operate over large spatial scales, prompting the need to assess and monitor both site-specific and regional dynamics of fish populations. We used hierarchical Bayesian models to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability in density and capture probability of age-1 and older Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis from three-pass removal data collected at 291 sites over a 37-year time period (1975-2011) in Pennsylvania streams. There was high between-year variability in density, with annual posterior means ranging from 2.1 to 10.2 fish/100 m2; however, there was no significant long-term linear trend. Brook Trout density was positively correlated with elevation and negatively correlated with percent developed land use in the network catchment. Probability of capture did not vary substantially across sites or years but was negatively correlated with mean stream width. Because of the low spatiotemporal variation in capture probability and a strong correlation between first-pass CPUE (catch/min) and three-pass removal density estimates, the use of an abundance index based on first-pass CPUE could represent a cost-effective alternative to conducting multiple-pass removal sampling for some Brook Trout monitoring and assessment objectives. Single-pass indices may be particularly relevant for monitoring objectives that do not require precise site-specific estimates, such as regional monitoring programs that are designed to detect long-term linear trends in density.Received April 22, 2013; accepted September 18, 2013. © 2014

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-269
Number of pages12
JournalNorth American Journal of Fisheries Management
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Salvelinus fontinalis
population density
monitoring
catch per unit effort
abundance index
fish
aquatic environment
land use
brook
catchment
sampling
cost
removal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Wagner, Tyler ; Deweber, Jefferson T. ; Detar, Jason ; Kristine, David ; Sweka, John A. / Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in Brook Trout Density : Implications for Population Monitoring. In: North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 2014 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 258-269.
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Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in Brook Trout Density : Implications for Population Monitoring. / Wagner, Tyler; Deweber, Jefferson T.; Detar, Jason; Kristine, David; Sweka, John A.

In: North American Journal of Fisheries Management, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 258-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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