Spatial variation in soil inorganic nitrogen across an arid urban ecosystem

Diane Hope, Weixing Zhu, Corinna Gries, Jacob Oleson, Jason Philip Kaye, Nancy B. Grimm, Lawrence A. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We explored variations in inorganic soil nitrogen (N) concentrations across metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, and the surrounding desert using a probability-based synoptic survey. Data were examined using spatial statistics on the entire region, as well as for the desert and urban sites separately. Concentrations of both NO 3-N and NH 4-N were markedly higher and more heterogeneous amongst urban compared to desert soils. Regional variation in soil NO 3-N concentration was best explained by latitude, land use history, population density, along with percent cover of impervious surfaces and lawn, whereas soil NH 4-N concentrations were related to only latitude and population density. Within the urban area, patterns in both soil NO 3-N and NH 4-N were best predicted by elevation, population density and type of irrigation in the surrounding neighborhood. Spatial autocorrelation of soil NO 3-N concentrations explained 49% of variation among desert sites but was absent between urban sites. We suggest that inorganic soil N concentrations are controlled by a number of 'local' or 'neighborhood' human-related drivers in the city, rather than factors related to an urban-rural gradient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-273
Number of pages23
JournalUrban Ecosystems
Volume8
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

urban ecosystem
inorganic nitrogen
desert
spatial variation
population density
urban site
soil
population type
desert soil
regional difference
irrigation
soil nitrogen
urban area
land use
driver
autocorrelation
statistics
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Hope, D., Zhu, W., Gries, C., Oleson, J., Kaye, J. P., Grimm, N. B., & Baker, L. A. (2005). Spatial variation in soil inorganic nitrogen across an arid urban ecosystem. Urban Ecosystems, 8(3-4), 251-273. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-005-3261-9
Hope, Diane ; Zhu, Weixing ; Gries, Corinna ; Oleson, Jacob ; Kaye, Jason Philip ; Grimm, Nancy B. ; Baker, Lawrence A. / Spatial variation in soil inorganic nitrogen across an arid urban ecosystem. In: Urban Ecosystems. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 3-4. pp. 251-273.
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Hope, D, Zhu, W, Gries, C, Oleson, J, Kaye, JP, Grimm, NB & Baker, LA 2005, 'Spatial variation in soil inorganic nitrogen across an arid urban ecosystem', Urban Ecosystems, vol. 8, no. 3-4, pp. 251-273. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-005-3261-9

Spatial variation in soil inorganic nitrogen across an arid urban ecosystem. / Hope, Diane; Zhu, Weixing; Gries, Corinna; Oleson, Jacob; Kaye, Jason Philip; Grimm, Nancy B.; Baker, Lawrence A.

In: Urban Ecosystems, Vol. 8, No. 3-4, 01.12.2005, p. 251-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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