Spatial variation of soil organic carbon in a northeastern U.S. watershed

Curtis James Dell, Andrew N. Sharpley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing the accumulation of organic carbon (C) in agricultural soils provides one means to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, but detection of the relatively small changes in soil organic C is complicated by spatial variability. Soil organic C variation was assessed at various scales within a small (40 ha; 98 ac), mixed-use watershed in central Pennsylvania to determine sampling requirement for possible C credit programs. Composite soil samples (0 to 5 cm; 0 to 2 in deep) were collected on 30-m (98-ft) grid intervals across the watershed and at 10- and 0.6-m (33- and 2-ft) intervals at selected locations, and descriptive- and geo-statistical analysis utilized. Concentrations of soil organic C in pasture and forest soils were approximately two times greater than cultivated fields, where means ranged from 15 to 24 g C kg-1 (1.5 to 2.4 percent) and coefficients of variation were typically 15 to 20 percent. Soil organic C was spatially dependent over a range of approximately 200 m (66ï ft) when sampled at 30-m (98-ft) intervals, and high nugget variances indicated spatially-dependent variability over lag distances shorter than 30 m (98ft). However, sampling at 10-m (33 ft) intervals appeared to adequately describe variation. Estimates of sample size requirement showed that, with the observed coefficient variances for individual fields, two- to five-fold increases in sample numbers would be required to verify statistically significant soil organic C changes ≤ 10 percent. Given the large number of samples required to provide representative measurements and the concurrent cost for labor and analysis, participation by farmers in a C credit program could be low if measured verification of soil organic C increases are required. Basing payments on modeled, rather than measured C sequestration rates, should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Soil and Water Conservation
Volume61
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 12 2006

Fingerprint

organic soils
soil organic carbon
organic soil
spatial variation
organic carbon
watershed
soil
credit
sampling
carbon dioxide
agricultural soils
agricultural soil
carbon sequestration
forest soils
forest soil
pasture
labor
statistical analysis
soil sampling
pastures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Dell, Curtis James ; Sharpley, Andrew N. / Spatial variation of soil organic carbon in a northeastern U.S. watershed. In: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation. 2006 ; Vol. 61, No. 3. pp. 129-136.
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Spatial variation of soil organic carbon in a northeastern U.S. watershed. / Dell, Curtis James; Sharpley, Andrew N.

In: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, Vol. 61, No. 3, 12.12.2006, p. 129-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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