Spatiotemporal analysis of regional socio-economic vulnerability change associated with heat risks in Canada

Hung Chak Ho, Anders Knudby, Guangqing Chi, Mehdi Aminipouri, Derrick Yuk Fo Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Excess mortality can be caused by extreme hot weather events, which are increasing in severity and frequency in Canada due to climate change. Individual and social vulnerability factors influence the mortality risk associated with a given heat exposure. We constructed heat vulnerability indices using census data from 2006 to 2011 in Canada, developed a novel design to compare spatiotemporal changes of heat vulnerability, and identified locations that may be increasingly vulnerable to heat. The results suggest that 1) urban areas in Canada are particularly vulnerable to heat, 2) suburban areas and satellite cities around major metropolitan areas show the greatest increases in vulnerability, and 3) heat vulnerability changes are driven primarily by changes in the density of older ages and infants. Our approach is applicable to heat vulnerability analyses in other countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-70
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Geography
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

spatiotemporal analysis
heat
socioeconomics
vulnerability
Canada
economics
mortality
mortality risk
suburban area
suburban areas
census data
metropolitan area
Socio-economics
Vulnerability
census
urban areas
urban area
agglomeration area
infant
climate change

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

Cite this

Ho, Hung Chak ; Knudby, Anders ; Chi, Guangqing ; Aminipouri, Mehdi ; Lai, Derrick Yuk Fo. / Spatiotemporal analysis of regional socio-economic vulnerability change associated with heat risks in Canada. In: Applied Geography. 2018 ; Vol. 95. pp. 61-70.
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Spatiotemporal analysis of regional socio-economic vulnerability change associated with heat risks in Canada. / Ho, Hung Chak; Knudby, Anders; Chi, Guangqing; Aminipouri, Mehdi; Lai, Derrick Yuk Fo.

In: Applied Geography, Vol. 95, 01.06.2018, p. 61-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Spatiotemporal analysis of regional socio-economic vulnerability change associated with heat risks in Canada

AU - Ho, Hung Chak

AU - Knudby, Anders

AU - Chi, Guangqing

AU - Aminipouri, Mehdi

AU - Lai, Derrick Yuk Fo

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