Special series on arts-based educational research art in science?

Elliot Eisner, Kimberly Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents the results of a study of artistry in the practice of research in the social sciences. Traditionally, science and art have been regarded as complementary, one dealing with the expression of feeling, the other with the pursuit of truth. Art, it is widely believed, is largely ornamental in life-nice but not necessary; science is critical to the future. Yet science has a personal side as well as a public one. What is the personal side of science like for those engaged in research in the social sciences? Do artistic considerations function in doing science? If so, where and when? We interviewed social scientists who were fellows at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences to secure insight into the role that artistry might play in the course of their work. This article describes what we learned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-159
Number of pages28
JournalCurriculum Inquiry
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

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educational research
art
science
social science
behavioral science
social scientist

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Special series on arts-based educational research art in science? / Eisner, Elliot; Powell, Kimberly.

In: Curriculum Inquiry, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.12.2002, p. 132-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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