Specific etiologies associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children

Part 2

Jeffrey S. Upperman, John C. Bucuvalas, Felicia N. Williams, Bruce A. Cairns, Charles S. Cox, Allan Doctor, Robert Tamburro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe a number of conditions and therapies associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome presented as part of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Multiple Organ Dysfunction Workshop (March 26-27, 2015). In addition, the relationship between burn injuries and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is also included although it was not discussed at the workshop. Data Sources: Literature review, research data, and expert opinion. Study Selection: Not applicable. Data Extraction: Moderated by an expert from the field, issues relevant to the association of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome with a variety of conditions and therapies were presented, discussed, and debated with a focus on identifying knowledge gaps and the research priorities. Data Synthesis: Summary of presentations and discussion supported and supplemented by relevant literature. Conclusions: Sepsis and trauma are the two conditions most commonly associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome both in children and adults. However, many other pathophysiologic processes may result in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In this article, we discuss conditions such as liver failure and pancreatitis, pathophysiologic processes such as ischemia and hypoxia, and injuries such as trauma and burns. Additionally, therapeutic interventions such as medications, blood transfusions, transplantation may also precipitate and contribute to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The purpose of this article is to describe the association of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome with a variety of conditions and therapies in an attempt to identify similarities, differences, and opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S58-S66
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Multiple Organ Failure
Wounds and Injuries
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Therapeutics
Education
Information Storage and Retrieval
Liver Failure
Expert Testimony
Burns
Research
Blood Transfusion
Pancreatitis
Sepsis
Ischemia
Transplantation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Upperman, J. S., Bucuvalas, J. C., Williams, F. N., Cairns, B. A., Cox, C. S., Doctor, A., & Tamburro, R. (2017). Specific etiologies associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children: Part 2. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, 18(3), S58-S66. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001051
Upperman, Jeffrey S. ; Bucuvalas, John C. ; Williams, Felicia N. ; Cairns, Bruce A. ; Cox, Charles S. ; Doctor, Allan ; Tamburro, Robert. / Specific etiologies associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children : Part 2. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. S58-S66.
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Upperman, JS, Bucuvalas, JC, Williams, FN, Cairns, BA, Cox, CS, Doctor, A & Tamburro, R 2017, 'Specific etiologies associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children: Part 2', Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. S58-S66. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001051

Specific etiologies associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children : Part 2. / Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Bucuvalas, John C.; Williams, Felicia N.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Cox, Charles S.; Doctor, Allan; Tamburro, Robert.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.2017, p. S58-S66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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