Spectral implementation of an adaptive moving mesh method for phase-field equations

W. M. Feng, P. Yu, S. Y. Hu, Z. K. Liu, Q. Du, L. Q. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Phase-field simulations have been extensively applied to modeling microstructure evolution during various materials processes. However, large-scale simulations of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures are still computationally expensive. Among recent efforts to develop advanced numerical algorithms, the semi-implicit Fourier spectral method is found to be particularly efficient for systems involving long-range interactions as it is able to utilize the fast Fourier transforms (FFT) on uniform grids. In this paper, we report our recent progress in making grid points spatially adaptive in the physical domain via a moving mesh strategy, while maintaining a uniform grid in the computational domain for the spectral implementation. This approach not only provides more accurate treatment at the interfaces requiring higher resolution, but also retains the numerical efficiency of the semi-implicit Fourier spectral method. Numerical examples using the new adaptive moving mesh semi-implicit Fourier spectral method are presented for both two and three space dimensional microstructure simulations, and they are compared with those obtained by other methods. By maintaining a similar accuracy, the proposed method is shown to be far more efficient than the existing methods for microstructures with small ratios of interfacial widths to the domain size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-510
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume220
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Numerical Analysis
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

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