Sphingoid base 1-phosphate phosphatase: A key regulator of sphingolipid metabolism and stress response

Suzanne M. Mandala, Rosemary Thornton, Zhenxing Tu, Myra B. Kurtz, Joseph Nickels, James Broach, Ramil Menzeleev, Sarah Spiegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are second messengers with opposing roles in mammalian cell growth arrest and survival; their relative cellular level has been proposed to be a rheostat that determines the fate of cells. This report demonstrates that this rheostat is an evolutionarily conserved stress-regulatory mechanism that influences growth and survival of yeast. Although the role of sphingosine-1- phosphate in yeast was not previously examined, accumulation of ceramide has been shown to induce G1 arrest and cell death. We now have identified a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LBP1, that regulates the levels of phosphorylated sphingoid bases and ceramide. LBP1 was cloned from a yeast mutant that accumulated phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and diverted sphingoid base intermediates from sphingolipid pathways to glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. LBP1 and its homolog, LBP2, encode very hydrophobic proteins that contain a novel-conserved sequence motif for lipid phosphatases, and both have long-chain sphingoid base phosphate phosphatase activity. In vitro characterization of Lbp1p shows that this phosphatase is Mg2+-independent with high specificity for phosphorylated long-chain bases, phytosphingosine and sphingosine. The deletion of LBP1 results in the accumulation of phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and reduced ceramide levels. Moreover, deletion of LBP1 and LBP2 results in dramatically enhanced survival upon severe heat shock. Thus, these phosphatases play a previously unappreciated role in regulating ceramide and phosphorylated sphingoid base levels in yeast, and they modulate stress responses through sphingolipid metabolites in a manner that is reminiscent of their effects on mammalian cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 1998

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Sphingolipids
Ceramides
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Yeasts
Phosphates
phytosphingosine
Glycerophospholipids
Sphingosine
Conserved Sequence
Second Messenger Systems
Growth
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Shock
Cell Death
Hot Temperature
Lipids
Genes
Proteins
sphingosine 1-phosphate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Mandala, Suzanne M. ; Thornton, Rosemary ; Tu, Zhenxing ; Kurtz, Myra B. ; Nickels, Joseph ; Broach, James ; Menzeleev, Ramil ; Spiegel, Sarah. / Sphingoid base 1-phosphate phosphatase : A key regulator of sphingolipid metabolism and stress response. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1998 ; Vol. 95, No. 1. pp. 150-155.
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abstract = "The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are second messengers with opposing roles in mammalian cell growth arrest and survival; their relative cellular level has been proposed to be a rheostat that determines the fate of cells. This report demonstrates that this rheostat is an evolutionarily conserved stress-regulatory mechanism that influences growth and survival of yeast. Although the role of sphingosine-1- phosphate in yeast was not previously examined, accumulation of ceramide has been shown to induce G1 arrest and cell death. We now have identified a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LBP1, that regulates the levels of phosphorylated sphingoid bases and ceramide. LBP1 was cloned from a yeast mutant that accumulated phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and diverted sphingoid base intermediates from sphingolipid pathways to glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. LBP1 and its homolog, LBP2, encode very hydrophobic proteins that contain a novel-conserved sequence motif for lipid phosphatases, and both have long-chain sphingoid base phosphate phosphatase activity. In vitro characterization of Lbp1p shows that this phosphatase is Mg2+-independent with high specificity for phosphorylated long-chain bases, phytosphingosine and sphingosine. The deletion of LBP1 results in the accumulation of phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and reduced ceramide levels. Moreover, deletion of LBP1 and LBP2 results in dramatically enhanced survival upon severe heat shock. Thus, these phosphatases play a previously unappreciated role in regulating ceramide and phosphorylated sphingoid base levels in yeast, and they modulate stress responses through sphingolipid metabolites in a manner that is reminiscent of their effects on mammalian cells.",
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Sphingoid base 1-phosphate phosphatase : A key regulator of sphingolipid metabolism and stress response. / Mandala, Suzanne M.; Thornton, Rosemary; Tu, Zhenxing; Kurtz, Myra B.; Nickels, Joseph; Broach, James; Menzeleev, Ramil; Spiegel, Sarah.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 95, No. 1, 06.01.1998, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Mandala, Suzanne M.

AU - Thornton, Rosemary

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N2 - The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are second messengers with opposing roles in mammalian cell growth arrest and survival; their relative cellular level has been proposed to be a rheostat that determines the fate of cells. This report demonstrates that this rheostat is an evolutionarily conserved stress-regulatory mechanism that influences growth and survival of yeast. Although the role of sphingosine-1- phosphate in yeast was not previously examined, accumulation of ceramide has been shown to induce G1 arrest and cell death. We now have identified a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LBP1, that regulates the levels of phosphorylated sphingoid bases and ceramide. LBP1 was cloned from a yeast mutant that accumulated phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and diverted sphingoid base intermediates from sphingolipid pathways to glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. LBP1 and its homolog, LBP2, encode very hydrophobic proteins that contain a novel-conserved sequence motif for lipid phosphatases, and both have long-chain sphingoid base phosphate phosphatase activity. In vitro characterization of Lbp1p shows that this phosphatase is Mg2+-independent with high specificity for phosphorylated long-chain bases, phytosphingosine and sphingosine. The deletion of LBP1 results in the accumulation of phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and reduced ceramide levels. Moreover, deletion of LBP1 and LBP2 results in dramatically enhanced survival upon severe heat shock. Thus, these phosphatases play a previously unappreciated role in regulating ceramide and phosphorylated sphingoid base levels in yeast, and they modulate stress responses through sphingolipid metabolites in a manner that is reminiscent of their effects on mammalian cells.

AB - The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are second messengers with opposing roles in mammalian cell growth arrest and survival; their relative cellular level has been proposed to be a rheostat that determines the fate of cells. This report demonstrates that this rheostat is an evolutionarily conserved stress-regulatory mechanism that influences growth and survival of yeast. Although the role of sphingosine-1- phosphate in yeast was not previously examined, accumulation of ceramide has been shown to induce G1 arrest and cell death. We now have identified a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LBP1, that regulates the levels of phosphorylated sphingoid bases and ceramide. LBP1 was cloned from a yeast mutant that accumulated phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and diverted sphingoid base intermediates from sphingolipid pathways to glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. LBP1 and its homolog, LBP2, encode very hydrophobic proteins that contain a novel-conserved sequence motif for lipid phosphatases, and both have long-chain sphingoid base phosphate phosphatase activity. In vitro characterization of Lbp1p shows that this phosphatase is Mg2+-independent with high specificity for phosphorylated long-chain bases, phytosphingosine and sphingosine. The deletion of LBP1 results in the accumulation of phosphorylated long-chain sphingoid bases and reduced ceramide levels. Moreover, deletion of LBP1 and LBP2 results in dramatically enhanced survival upon severe heat shock. Thus, these phosphatases play a previously unappreciated role in regulating ceramide and phosphorylated sphingoid base levels in yeast, and they modulate stress responses through sphingolipid metabolites in a manner that is reminiscent of their effects on mammalian cells.

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