Spillovers in Space: Does Geography Matter?

Sergey Lychagin, Joris Pinkse, Margaret E. Slade, John Van Reenen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using U.S. firm level panel data we simultaneously assess the contributions to productivity of three potential sources of research and development spillovers: geographic, technological, and product market ("horizontal"). To do so, we construct new measures of geographic proximity based on the distribution of a firm's inventor locations as well as its headquarters. We find that geographic location is important for productivity, as are technology (but not product) spillovers, and that both intra and inter-regional (counties) spillovers matter. The geographic location of a firm's researchers is more important than its headquarters. These benefits may be the reason why local policy makers compete so hard for the location of local R&D labs and high tech workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-335
Number of pages41
JournalJournal of Industrial Economics
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Geography
Spillover
Headquarters
Productivity
Geographic location
Proximity
Inventor
Politicians
Product market
High-tech
Panel data
Workers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Accounting
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Lychagin, Sergey ; Pinkse, Joris ; Slade, Margaret E. ; Reenen, John Van. / Spillovers in Space : Does Geography Matter?. In: Journal of Industrial Economics. 2016 ; Vol. 64, No. 2. pp. 295-335.
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Spillovers in Space : Does Geography Matter? / Lychagin, Sergey; Pinkse, Joris; Slade, Margaret E.; Reenen, John Van.

In: Journal of Industrial Economics, Vol. 64, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 295-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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