Sports and nutritional supplement use in USMC recruits: A pilot study

Colin R. Young, Mark Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This is a pilot study to describe patterns of nutritional supplement use by recruits entering the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC). Methods: A survey asking USMC recruits to self-report nutritional supplement use was administered upon entry to basic training. Simple descriptive statistics and prevalence ratios were used to describe patterns of supplement use. Results: The response rate was 65%. Half of respondents reported nutritional sports supplement use at some point before boot camp. The five most commonly supplements were: protein powder (43%), postrecovery workout drinks (36%), vitamin supplements (26%), creatine (26%), and nitric oxide (16%). Conclusions: Nutritional supplement use is frequent among recruits entering the USMC. The impact of supplement use on recruit fitness, training, and injury rates is not known.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-161
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume174
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Military Personnel
Sports
Creatine
Vitamins
Powders
Self Report
Nitric Oxide
Wounds and Injuries
Proteins
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: This is a pilot study to describe patterns of nutritional supplement use by recruits entering the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC). Methods: A survey asking USMC recruits to self-report nutritional supplement use was administered upon entry to basic training. Simple descriptive statistics and prevalence ratios were used to describe patterns of supplement use. Results: The response rate was 65{\%}. Half of respondents reported nutritional sports supplement use at some point before boot camp. The five most commonly supplements were: protein powder (43{\%}), postrecovery workout drinks (36{\%}), vitamin supplements (26{\%}), creatine (26{\%}), and nitric oxide (16{\%}). Conclusions: Nutritional supplement use is frequent among recruits entering the USMC. The impact of supplement use on recruit fitness, training, and injury rates is not known.",
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Sports and nutritional supplement use in USMC recruits : A pilot study. / Young, Colin R.; Stephens, Mark.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 174, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 158-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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