Spouses' and physicians' perceptions of pain severity in older women with osteoarthritis: Dyadic agreement and patients' well-being

Julie K. Cremeans-Smith, Mary Ann Parris Stephens, Melissa M. Franks, Lynn M. Martire, Jennifer A. Druley, William C. Wojno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined agreement between patients and two role partners (spouses and physicians) on patients' pain severity and the relationships between dyadic agreement and patients' well-being. We hypothesized that compared to disagreement between patients and role partners, dyadic agreement would be related to better psychological well-being (more disease-specific self-efficacy and positive affect, and less depression). Participants were 114 older women with osteoarthritis, their caregiving husbands, and their rheumatologists. Among patient-spouse dyads, agreement was associated with better well-being, especially when compared to spouses' underestimation of patients' pain. Contrary to predictions, patient-physician agreement was not related to better patient well-being. Agreement between patients and physicians was associated with less (rather than more) self-efficacy and positive affect when compared to physicians' underestimation of patients' pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalPain
Volume106
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Spouses' and physicians' perceptions of pain severity in older women with osteoarthritis: Dyadic agreement and patients' well-being'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this