Stability and change in parental attachment and adjustment outcomes during the first semester transition to college life

Marnie Hiester, Alicia Nordstrom, Lisa M. Swenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between parental attachment, changes in parental attachment, and psychological functioning and adjustment for college freshmen. Twice during the first semester, 271 freshmen completed self-report measures of parental attachment, psychological distress, self-competence, and college adjustment. Higher attachment security was associated with more positive outcomes for both men and women. Although individual differences in parental attachment remained consistent across the first semester, attachment security decreased for male students who lived at home. Students whose relationships with parents deteriorated over time had higher levels of distress and lower adjustment scores. Implications for college counselors are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-538
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of College Student Development
Volume50
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

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semester
counselor
parents
student
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Stability and change in parental attachment and adjustment outcomes during the first semester transition to college life. / Hiester, Marnie; Nordstrom, Alicia; Swenson, Lisa M.

In: Journal of College Student Development, Vol. 50, No. 5, 01.09.2009, p. 521-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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