Stability and the time-dependent structure of gait variability in walking and running

Kimberlee Jordan, John Henry Challis, Joseph Paul Cusumano, Karl M. Newell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Participants were asked to walk and run continuously (5 min trials) at speeds associated with preferred gait transition speeds. During slow running the local dynamic stability of the head was decreased compared with fast walking, with the reverse being true for the local dynamic stability of the ankle. The standard deviation of relative phase of the knee and ankle also was greater during slow running than fast walking. These findings for stability were mirrored in the detrended fluctuation analysis of the peak to peak interval of the head and ankle. Taken collectively these results support the proposition that larger long range correlations in the stride interval are associated with decreases in measures of stability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-128
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

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Gait
Ankle
Running
Walking
Head
Knee

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

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Stability and the time-dependent structure of gait variability in walking and running. / Jordan, Kimberlee; Challis, John Henry; Cusumano, Joseph Paul; Newell, Karl M.

In: Human Movement Science, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.02.2009, p. 113-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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