Stable, nanoscale glycosphingolipid films for use in sensing applications

Rory Stine, Cara-Lynne Schengrund, Michael V. Pishko

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

We have developed a means of producing thin, oriented lipid monolayers which are stable under repeated washing and which may be useful in biosensing or surface-coating applications. Phosphotidylcholine (PC) and the glycosphingolipid (GSL) GM1 were used as representative lipids for this process. Initially, a mixed self-assembled monolayer of octanethiol and hexadecanethiol was constructed on a clean gold surface. This hydrophobic surface was then brought into contact with a thin lipid layer that had been deposited at the air/liquid interface of a solution by evaporating a mixture of lipid in hexane on top of a layer of water. The lipid layer, now deposited on the gold surface, was then heated to cause intercalation of the fatty acid and alkanethiol chains, and cooled to form a highly stable film which withstood repeated rinsing and solution exposure. Presence and stability of the film was confirmed via ellipsometry, FTIR, and QCM, with an average overall thickness of ∼3.5 nm. These films may be potentially useful in biotoxin detection or as a protein resistant layer for the prevention of biofouling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-236
Number of pages6
JournalMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
Volume823
StatePublished - Oct 26 2004
EventBiological and Bioinspired Materials and Devices - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Apr 13 2004Apr 16 2004

Fingerprint

Glycosphingolipids
Lipids
lipids
Gold
gold
Biofouling
liquid air
washing
Ellipsometry
Hexanes
Self assembled monolayers
fatty acids
Intercalation
Hexane
Fatty acids
Washing
intercalation
ellipsometry
Monolayers
Fatty Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Stine, Rory ; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne ; Pishko, Michael V. / Stable, nanoscale glycosphingolipid films for use in sensing applications. In: Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. 2004 ; Vol. 823. pp. 231-236.
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Stable, nanoscale glycosphingolipid films for use in sensing applications. / Stine, Rory; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne; Pishko, Michael V.

In: Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings, Vol. 823, 26.10.2004, p. 231-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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AB - We have developed a means of producing thin, oriented lipid monolayers which are stable under repeated washing and which may be useful in biosensing or surface-coating applications. Phosphotidylcholine (PC) and the glycosphingolipid (GSL) GM1 were used as representative lipids for this process. Initially, a mixed self-assembled monolayer of octanethiol and hexadecanethiol was constructed on a clean gold surface. This hydrophobic surface was then brought into contact with a thin lipid layer that had been deposited at the air/liquid interface of a solution by evaporating a mixture of lipid in hexane on top of a layer of water. The lipid layer, now deposited on the gold surface, was then heated to cause intercalation of the fatty acid and alkanethiol chains, and cooled to form a highly stable film which withstood repeated rinsing and solution exposure. Presence and stability of the film was confirmed via ellipsometry, FTIR, and QCM, with an average overall thickness of ∼3.5 nm. These films may be potentially useful in biotoxin detection or as a protein resistant layer for the prevention of biofouling.

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