Starting early: Obesity prevention during infancy

Leann L. Birch, Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, Ian M. Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity prevalence among infants and young children has increased rapidly during the past 4 decades, a disturbing trend given early obesity's association with later life obesity and its comorbidities. Fortunately, infancy is a period of great behavioral and metabolic plasticity offering numerous targets for preventive interventions. Modifiable factors that may affect early rapid weight gain and obesity risk include infant sleep duration, feeding to soothe infant distress, and the introduction of solid foods and transitional feeding. We discuss evidence linking these factors to weight outcomes, as well as results from behavioral obesity interventions in infancy, from our laboratory and others'. For example, in a recent pilot intervention, we focused on helping new mothers address three areas of infant behavior hypothesized to affect weight gain and early obesity risk: infant sleeping, crying, and feeding. First-time mothers were randomly assigned to receive either a Soothe/Sleep intervention, an Introduction of Solids intervention, both interventions, or no interventions. The interventions were delivered via home visits and showed positive effects on infant behaviors and weight outcomes at 1 year. Based on evidence from such pilot interventions, we assess the plausibility of targeting behavioral factors in infancy and suggest next steps for early prevention research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-94
Number of pages14
JournalNestle Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume73
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

infancy
obesity
Obesity
Infant Behavior
Weight Gain
sleep
Sleep
Mothers
Weights and Measures
Crying
weight gain
House Calls
Pediatric Obesity
Comorbidity
distress
Food
duration
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Birch, Leann L. ; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie ; Paul, Ian M. / Starting early : Obesity prevention during infancy. In: Nestle Nutrition Institute Workshop Series. 2012 ; Vol. 73. pp. 81-94.
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Starting early : Obesity prevention during infancy. / Birch, Leann L.; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Paul, Ian M.

In: Nestle Nutrition Institute Workshop Series, Vol. 73, 01.01.2012, p. 81-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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