Status report from the scientific panel on antibiotic use in dermatology of the American acne and rosacea society part 1: Antibiotic prescribing patterns, sources of antibiotic exposure, antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance, impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use

James Q. Del rosso, Guy F. Webster, Ted Rosen, Diane Thiboutot, James J. Leyden, Richard Gallo, Clay Walker, George Zhanel, Lawrence Eichenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oral and topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed in dermatologic practice, often for noninfectious disorders, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. Concerns related to antibiotic exposure from both medical and nonmedical sources require that clinicians consider in each case why and how antibiotics are being used and to make appropriate adjustments to limit antibiotic exposure whenever possible. This first article of a three-part series discusses prescribing patterns in dermatology, provides an overview of sources of antibiotic exposure, reviews the relative correlations between the magnitude of antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance patterns, evaluates the impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and discusses the potential relevance and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use, with emphasis on how antibiotics are used in dermatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-24
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology
Volume9
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Rosacea
Microbial Drug Resistance
Dermatology
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Acne Vulgaris

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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AU - Walker, Clay

AU - Zhanel, George

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