Status report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society - Part 3: Current perspectives on skin and soft tissue infections with emphasis on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly encountered scenarios when antibiotic use may not be needed, and concluding remarks on rational use of antibiotics in dermatology

James Q. Del Rosso, Ted Rosen, Diane Thiboutot, Guy F. Webster, Richard L. Gallo, James J. Leyden, Clay Walker, George Zhanel, Lawrence Eichenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this third article of the three-part series, management of skin and soft tissue infections is reviewed with emphasis on new information on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Due to changes in the evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones, previous distinctions between healthcare-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are currently much less clinically relevant. Many nosocomial cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection are now caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with changing patterns of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance. Also reviewed are clinical scenarios where antibiotics may not be needed and suggestions for optimal use of antibiotic therapy for dermatologic conditions, including recommendations on perioperative antibiotic use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology
Volume9
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

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