Stepfamily Relationship Quality and Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Problems

Todd M. Jensen, Melissa A. Lippold, Roger Mills-Koonce, Gregory M. Fosco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The stepfamily literature is replete with between-group analyses by which youth residing in stepfamilies are compared to youth in other family structures across indicators of adjustment and well-being. Few longitudinal studies examine variation in stepfamily functioning to identify factors that promote the positive adjustment of stepchildren over time. Using a longitudinal sample of 191 stepchildren (56% female, mean age = 11.3 years), the current study examines the association between the relationship quality of three central stepfamily dyads (stepparent-child, parent-child, and stepcouple) and children's internalizing and externalizing problems concurrently and over time. Results from path analyses indicate that higher levels of parent-child affective quality are associated with lower levels of children's concurrent internalizing and externalizing problems at Wave 1. Higher levels of stepparent-child affective quality are associated with decreases in children's internalizing and externalizing problems at Wave 2 (6 months beyond baseline), even after controlling for children's internalizing and externalizing problems at Wave 1 and other covariates. The stepcouple relationship was not directly linked to youth outcomes. Our findings provide implications for future research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFamily Process
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

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stepchild
Social Adjustment
parents
Parents
family structure
dyad
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
well-being
Group
time
literature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Stepfamily Relationship Quality and Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Problems. / Jensen, Todd M.; Lippold, Melissa A.; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Fosco, Gregory M.

In: Family Process, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Fosco, Gregory M.

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