Stereotype content and social distancing from employees with mental illness: The moderating roles of gender and social dominance orientation

Kayla B. Follmer, Kisha Shannon Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental illness is increasingly prevalent among employees, but little is known about how these individuals are perceived at work. Using the stereotype content model as a framework, we investigated warmth and competence stereotypes associated with employees with anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Employees with these disorders were perceived to be low in warmth and competence, and stereotypes about individuals with anxiety were relatively more positive than those with depression or bipolar. This study also proposed and tested the extent to which stereotypes predicted work-related social distancing intentions. We found that two characteristics moderated this relationship: gender and social dominance orientation. We discuss practical and theoretical implications as they pertain to improving the experiences and well-being of employees with mental illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)492-504
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume47
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Social Dominance
Bipolar Disorder
Mental Competency
Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

@article{1d78d99d79fe424dbbd0d3a465498e1f,
title = "Stereotype content and social distancing from employees with mental illness: The moderating roles of gender and social dominance orientation",
abstract = "Mental illness is increasingly prevalent among employees, but little is known about how these individuals are perceived at work. Using the stereotype content model as a framework, we investigated warmth and competence stereotypes associated with employees with anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Employees with these disorders were perceived to be low in warmth and competence, and stereotypes about individuals with anxiety were relatively more positive than those with depression or bipolar. This study also proposed and tested the extent to which stereotypes predicted work-related social distancing intentions. We found that two characteristics moderated this relationship: gender and social dominance orientation. We discuss practical and theoretical implications as they pertain to improving the experiences and well-being of employees with mental illness.",
author = "Follmer, {Kayla B.} and Jones, {Kisha Shannon}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jasp.12455",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "492--504",
journal = "Journal of Applied Social Psychology",
issn = "0021-9029",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stereotype content and social distancing from employees with mental illness

T2 - The moderating roles of gender and social dominance orientation

AU - Follmer, Kayla B.

AU - Jones, Kisha Shannon

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Mental illness is increasingly prevalent among employees, but little is known about how these individuals are perceived at work. Using the stereotype content model as a framework, we investigated warmth and competence stereotypes associated with employees with anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Employees with these disorders were perceived to be low in warmth and competence, and stereotypes about individuals with anxiety were relatively more positive than those with depression or bipolar. This study also proposed and tested the extent to which stereotypes predicted work-related social distancing intentions. We found that two characteristics moderated this relationship: gender and social dominance orientation. We discuss practical and theoretical implications as they pertain to improving the experiences and well-being of employees with mental illness.

AB - Mental illness is increasingly prevalent among employees, but little is known about how these individuals are perceived at work. Using the stereotype content model as a framework, we investigated warmth and competence stereotypes associated with employees with anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Employees with these disorders were perceived to be low in warmth and competence, and stereotypes about individuals with anxiety were relatively more positive than those with depression or bipolar. This study also proposed and tested the extent to which stereotypes predicted work-related social distancing intentions. We found that two characteristics moderated this relationship: gender and social dominance orientation. We discuss practical and theoretical implications as they pertain to improving the experiences and well-being of employees with mental illness.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85023170719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85023170719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jasp.12455

DO - 10.1111/jasp.12455

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85023170719

VL - 47

SP - 492

EP - 504

JO - Journal of Applied Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Applied Social Psychology

SN - 0021-9029

IS - 9

ER -