Stereotypical Hate Crimes and Criminal Justice Processing: A Multi-Dataset Comparison of Bias Crime Arrest Patterns by Offender and Victim Race

Brendan Lantz, Andrew S. Gladfelter, R. Barry Ruback

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many hate crimes are not reported and even fewer hate crimes result in an arrest. This study investigates patterns of victim reporting and arrest for hate crimes in two parts. First, using data from the National Crime Victimization Survey, we find that, controlling for offense severity, hate crimes are less likely than non-bias crimes to be reported to the police and that the police are less likely to take further action for hate crimes, compared to non-hate crimes. Second, we use data from the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission and the National Incident-Based Reporting System to compare differences between types of hate crimes in the likelihood of crime clearance. We find that those hate crimes most likely to result in arrest are those that fit the profile of a “stereotypical” hate crime: violent incidents, incidents committed by hate groups, and incidents involving white offenders and black victims.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-224
Number of pages32
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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