Sterile inflammation associated with transradial catheterization and hydrophilic sheaths

Mark Kozak, David R. Adams, Michael D. Ioffreda, Michelle J. Nickolaus, Thomas J. Seery, Charles E. Chambers, Steven M. Ettinger, Patrick H. McNulty, Ian C. Gilchrist

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Abstract

In 1999, we noted the development of inflammation and/or abscesses at the site of radial access in a group of patients. Over a 3-year period, we noted this inflammation in 33 patients out of 2,038 (1.6%) who had catheterization via the radial approach. The radial abscesses occurred in 30 patients out of 1,063 (2.8%) in whom we could confirm the use of a hydrophilic-coated sheath, but in no patient for whom we can document that an uncoated sheath was used. No infectious agent could be implicated, and the time course for the development of the abscess, typically 2 to 3 weeks, seemed long for a bacterial infection. Later patients had biopsies, and granulomatous reactions were seen in most. Additionally, a few of the biopsies showed an amorphous extravascular substance consistent with the catheter coating. All patients had good long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-213
Number of pages7
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

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Catheterization
Inflammation
Abscess
Biopsy
Bacterial Infections
Catheters

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Sterile inflammation associated with transradial catheterization and hydrophilic sheaths",
abstract = "In 1999, we noted the development of inflammation and/or abscesses at the site of radial access in a group of patients. Over a 3-year period, we noted this inflammation in 33 patients out of 2,038 (1.6{\%}) who had catheterization via the radial approach. The radial abscesses occurred in 30 patients out of 1,063 (2.8{\%}) in whom we could confirm the use of a hydrophilic-coated sheath, but in no patient for whom we can document that an uncoated sheath was used. No infectious agent could be implicated, and the time course for the development of the abscess, typically 2 to 3 weeks, seemed long for a bacterial infection. Later patients had biopsies, and granulomatous reactions were seen in most. Additionally, a few of the biopsies showed an amorphous extravascular substance consistent with the catheter coating. All patients had good long-term outcomes.",
author = "Mark Kozak and Adams, {David R.} and Ioffreda, {Michael D.} and Nickolaus, {Michelle J.} and Seery, {Thomas J.} and Chambers, {Charles E.} and Ettinger, {Steven M.} and McNulty, {Patrick H.} and Gilchrist, {Ian C.}",
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T1 - Sterile inflammation associated with transradial catheterization and hydrophilic sheaths

AU - Kozak, Mark

AU - Adams, David R.

AU - Ioffreda, Michael D.

AU - Nickolaus, Michelle J.

AU - Seery, Thomas J.

AU - Chambers, Charles E.

AU - Ettinger, Steven M.

AU - McNulty, Patrick H.

AU - Gilchrist, Ian C.

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

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