Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters

Jack H. Young, William C. Lasher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Steam-in-place (SIP) sterilization was carried out on 9.4 cm long tubes with inside diameters varying from 0.39 to 1.6 cm. Tubes were orientated vertically and B. stearothermophilus spores used to monitor sterilization. Time to achieve sterilization was strongly dependent on tube diameter with the larger diameter tube requiring less than eighteen minutes to sterilize, whereas the smallest tube could not be sterilized in two hours. A two-dimensional finite element model was developed and predicted steam penetration up the tubes to be buoyancy driven with larger diameter tubes achieving saturated steam conditions faster than smaller tubes. Cellular flow patterns were predicted with tube diameter determining cellular size and thus rate of steam penetration up the tube.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1992 Advances in Bioengineering
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages457-460
Number of pages4
Volume22
ISBN (Print)0791811166
StatePublished - 1992
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Nov 8 1992Nov 13 1992

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period11/8/9211/13/92

Fingerprint

Flow patterns
Steam
Buoyancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Young, J. H., & Lasher, W. C. (1992). Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters. In 1992 Advances in Bioengineering (Vol. 22, pp. 457-460). Publ by ASME.
Young, Jack H. ; Lasher, William C. / Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters. 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22 Publ by ASME, 1992. pp. 457-460
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Young, JH & Lasher, WC 1992, Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters. in 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. vol. 22, Publ by ASME, pp. 457-460, Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Anaheim, CA, USA, 11/8/92.

Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters. / Young, Jack H.; Lasher, William C.

1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22 Publ by ASME, 1992. p. 457-460.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Young JH, Lasher WC. Sterilization and flow patterns in vertically orientated dead-ended tubes of varying diameters. In 1992 Advances in Bioengineering. Vol. 22. Publ by ASME. 1992. p. 457-460