Strangers in the city: Transmigration from Eastern Europe and its impact on Berlin and Hamburg 1880-1914

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Abstract

This article examines the impact of transit migration from the Russian and Austro-Hungarian Empires on Berlin and Hamburg between 1880 and 1914. Both cities experienced massive growth during the last three decades of the nineteenth century, and both served as major points of passage for Eastern Europeans travelling to (and returning from) the United States. The rising migration from Eastern Europe through Central and Western European cities after 1880 coincided with the need to find adequate solutions to accommodate a rapidly growing number of commuters. The article demonstrates that the isolation of transmigrants in Berlin, Hamburg (and New York) during the 1890s was only partly related to containing contagious disease and 'undesirable' migrants. Isolating transmigrants was also a pragmatic response to the increasing pressure on the urban traffic infrastructure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-246
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Migration History
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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