Strategic Planning for Research in Pediatric Critical Care

Robert Tamburro, Tammara L. Jenkins, Patrick M. Kochanek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To summarize the scientific priorities and potential future research directions for pediatric critical care research discussed by a panel of experts at the inaugural Strategic Planning Conference of the Pediatric Trauma and Critical Illness Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Data Sources: Expert opinion expressed during the Strategic Planning Conference. Study Selection: Not applicable. Data Extraction: Chaired by an experienced expert from the field, issues relevant to the conduct of pediatric critical care research were discussed and debated by the invited participants. Data Synthesis: Common themes and suggested priorities were identified and coalesced. Conclusions: Of the many pathophysiologic conditions discussed, the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome emerged as a topic in need of more study that is most relevant to the field. Additionally, the experts offered that the interrelationship and impact of critical illness on child development and family functioning are important research priorities. Consequently, long-term outcomes research was encouraged. The expert group also suggested that multidisciplinary conferences are needed to help identify key knowledge gaps to advance and direct research in the field. The Pediatric Critical Care and Trauma Scientist Development National K12 Program and the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network were recognized as successful and important programs supported by the branch. The development of core data resources including biorepositories with robust phenotypic data using common data elements was also suggested to foster data sharing among investigators and to enhance disease diagnosis and discovery. Multicenter clinical trials and innovative study designs to address understudied and poorly understood conditions were considered important for field advancement. Finally, the growth of the pediatric critical care research workforce was offered as a priority that could be spawned in many ways including by expanded transdisciplinary and multiprofessional collaboration and diversity representation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e539-e542
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Pediatrics
Research
Critical Illness
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Multiple Organ Failure
Information Dissemination
Information Storage and Retrieval
Wounds and Injuries
Expert Testimony
Child Development
Multicenter Studies
Strategic Planning
Research Personnel
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Clinical Trials
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Tamburro, Robert ; Jenkins, Tammara L. ; Kochanek, Patrick M. / Strategic Planning for Research in Pediatric Critical Care. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 11. pp. e539-e542.
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Strategic Planning for Research in Pediatric Critical Care. / Tamburro, Robert; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. e539-e542.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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