Strategies for Motivating Higher Education Faculty to Use Technology

Daniel W. Surry, Susan Mary Land

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a framework that higher education administrators can use to increase the utilization of technology on their campuses. The framework is designed to increase technology usage in higher education by increasing the motivation of individual faculty members to use technology. The paper begins by describing how college administrators have come to view technology as a necessary tool for addressing many of the problems in higher education. The authors then describe a number of categories of technological innovations that can be used in higher education, including both 'product' technologies, such as computer-assisted instruction and 'idea' technologies, such as constructivism. The authors conclude by discussing strategies that can be used to increase faculty motivation to use technology. These strategies are based on Keller's (1983) ARCS Model and are divided into attention gaining strategies, relevance strategies, confidence building strategies, and satisfaction strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-153
Number of pages9
JournalInnovations in Education and Teaching International
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1 2000

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education
constructivism
technical innovation
confidence
utilization
instruction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Strategies for Motivating Higher Education Faculty to Use Technology. / Surry, Daniel W.; Land, Susan Mary.

In: Innovations in Education and Teaching International, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.05.2000, p. 145-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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