Stress relief in contact-aided cellular compliant mechanisms

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cellular structures with an internal contact-mechanism are investigated. These contact-aided compliant mechanisms are shown to reduce the local tensile stresses, thereby providing additional global strain before yielding or fracture failure compared to honeycomb or auxetic cellular structures. An analytical model for such structures is developed and it is validated using FEA simulations. Two different materials are considered for comparison. More than 100% improvement in global strain capability is possible using the contact. A high-strain morphing aircraft skin is examined as an application of these mechanisms. The contact-aided cellular compliant mechanisms are more advantageous in terms of both the structural mass as well as the global strain compared to a non-contact design. In the application considered the stress-relief mechanism increased the global strain capability by as high as 37%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008
Pages665-675
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
EventASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008 - Ellicott City, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 28 2008Oct 30 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008
Volume1

Other

OtherASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008
CountryUnited States
CityEllicott City, MD
Period10/28/0810/30/08

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Building and Construction

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stress relief in contact-aided cellular compliant mechanisms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Mehta, V., Frecker, M., & Lesieutre, G. (2008). Stress relief in contact-aided cellular compliant mechanisms. In Proceedings of the ASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008 (pp. 665-675). (Proceedings of the ASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS2008; Vol. 1). https://doi.org/10.1115/SMASIS2008-431