Striatal volume changes in the rat following long-term administration of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs

Candace Andersson, Robert M. Hamer, Cindy P. Lawler, Richard Mailman, Jeffrey A. Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Striatal enlargement has been consistently reported in schizophrenics receiving chronic neuroleptic treatment although the results following atypical antipsychotic treatment have been equivocal. In order to disentangle patient illness from a possible drug effect on brain structure, young adult rats were administered either haloperidol, risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine, or vehicle daily for four or eight months via drinking water. Significant increases in caudate-putamen volumes were seen in animals receiving either haloperidol or clozapine when compared with control animals following eight months of drug administration. Conversely, olanzapine-treated animals showed significant decreases in caudate-putamen volumes when compared with control animals after eight months of drug. Thus, converging evidence indicates that the neuroplastic response of the striatum following neuroleptic exposure causes volumetric increases, whereas atypical antipsychotics affect the basal ganglia differentially. The current data suggests that such differential responses may be due to both the pharmacological properties and the relative doses of the atypical agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-151
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Striatal volume changes in the rat following long-term administration of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this