Striking genetic similarity between races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris confirms a monophyletic origin and clonal evolution of the chickpea vascular wilt pathogen

Jill E. Demers, Carla D. Garzón, Maria Del Mar Jimenez Gasco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eight pathogenic races, determined based on the virulence displayed on differential chickpea cultivars, have been recognized in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris, the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of chickpea. In order to elucidate the genetic relationships between these races and understand how virulence evolved, we analyzed the sequences of 32 genomic regions for each of the eight races. Twelve of these regions were newly-designed microsatellite markers polymorphic for the F. oxysporum complex (10 displaying polymorphisms in the number of core repeats, and two displaying polymorphic nucleotides in the microsatellite flanking regions), developed from a microsatellite enriched genomic library. The translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), five mitochondrial regions, a xylanase gene (xyl4) and its transcriptional activator (xlnR), two F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) and 11 microsatellites were completely identical for all races. Only a few polymorphisms were observed between and sometimes within races for the β-tubulin gene, intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (IGS), endopolygalacturonase pg1 and exopolygalacturonase pgx4 genes, and six microsatellite regions (four loci with repeat number variations and two loci with polymorphisms in flanking regions). In a previous study, race 3 of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris was reported to be Fusarium proliferatum based on TEF data of one isolate. However, our sequence analyses using TEF and other regions showed that the race 3 isolates in our study belong to F. oxysporum. The high degree of similarity among races supports a monophyletic origin of this forma specialis and a subsequent development of pathogenic races within the lineage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-318
Number of pages16
JournalEuropean Journal of Plant Pathology
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris
vascular wilt
pathogens
microsatellite repeats
translation (genetics)
genetic polymorphism
Fusarium oxysporum
intergenic DNA
virulence
genetic similarity
Fusarium proliferatum
loci
genes
Fusarium wilt
genomic libraries
xylanases
polygalacturonase
tubulin
ribosomal DNA
internal transcribed spacers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Horticulture

Cite this

@article{4ee8311a980449e895b505620b787ba9,
title = "Striking genetic similarity between races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris confirms a monophyletic origin and clonal evolution of the chickpea vascular wilt pathogen",
abstract = "Eight pathogenic races, determined based on the virulence displayed on differential chickpea cultivars, have been recognized in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris, the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of chickpea. In order to elucidate the genetic relationships between these races and understand how virulence evolved, we analyzed the sequences of 32 genomic regions for each of the eight races. Twelve of these regions were newly-designed microsatellite markers polymorphic for the F. oxysporum complex (10 displaying polymorphisms in the number of core repeats, and two displaying polymorphic nucleotides in the microsatellite flanking regions), developed from a microsatellite enriched genomic library. The translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), five mitochondrial regions, a xylanase gene (xyl4) and its transcriptional activator (xlnR), two F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) and 11 microsatellites were completely identical for all races. Only a few polymorphisms were observed between and sometimes within races for the β-tubulin gene, intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (IGS), endopolygalacturonase pg1 and exopolygalacturonase pgx4 genes, and six microsatellite regions (four loci with repeat number variations and two loci with polymorphisms in flanking regions). In a previous study, race 3 of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris was reported to be Fusarium proliferatum based on TEF data of one isolate. However, our sequence analyses using TEF and other regions showed that the race 3 isolates in our study belong to F. oxysporum. The high degree of similarity among races supports a monophyletic origin of this forma specialis and a subsequent development of pathogenic races within the lineage.",
author = "Demers, {Jill E.} and Garz{\'o}n, {Carla D.} and {Jimenez Gasco}, {Maria Del Mar}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10658-014-0387-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "139",
pages = "303--318",
journal = "European Journal of Plant Pathology",
issn = "0929-1873",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Striking genetic similarity between races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris confirms a monophyletic origin and clonal evolution of the chickpea vascular wilt pathogen

AU - Demers, Jill E.

AU - Garzón, Carla D.

AU - Jimenez Gasco, Maria Del Mar

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Eight pathogenic races, determined based on the virulence displayed on differential chickpea cultivars, have been recognized in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris, the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of chickpea. In order to elucidate the genetic relationships between these races and understand how virulence evolved, we analyzed the sequences of 32 genomic regions for each of the eight races. Twelve of these regions were newly-designed microsatellite markers polymorphic for the F. oxysporum complex (10 displaying polymorphisms in the number of core repeats, and two displaying polymorphic nucleotides in the microsatellite flanking regions), developed from a microsatellite enriched genomic library. The translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), five mitochondrial regions, a xylanase gene (xyl4) and its transcriptional activator (xlnR), two F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) and 11 microsatellites were completely identical for all races. Only a few polymorphisms were observed between and sometimes within races for the β-tubulin gene, intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (IGS), endopolygalacturonase pg1 and exopolygalacturonase pgx4 genes, and six microsatellite regions (four loci with repeat number variations and two loci with polymorphisms in flanking regions). In a previous study, race 3 of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris was reported to be Fusarium proliferatum based on TEF data of one isolate. However, our sequence analyses using TEF and other regions showed that the race 3 isolates in our study belong to F. oxysporum. The high degree of similarity among races supports a monophyletic origin of this forma specialis and a subsequent development of pathogenic races within the lineage.

AB - Eight pathogenic races, determined based on the virulence displayed on differential chickpea cultivars, have been recognized in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris, the causal agent of Fusarium wilt of chickpea. In order to elucidate the genetic relationships between these races and understand how virulence evolved, we analyzed the sequences of 32 genomic regions for each of the eight races. Twelve of these regions were newly-designed microsatellite markers polymorphic for the F. oxysporum complex (10 displaying polymorphisms in the number of core repeats, and two displaying polymorphic nucleotides in the microsatellite flanking regions), developed from a microsatellite enriched genomic library. The translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA (ITS), five mitochondrial regions, a xylanase gene (xyl4) and its transcriptional activator (xlnR), two F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) and 11 microsatellites were completely identical for all races. Only a few polymorphisms were observed between and sometimes within races for the β-tubulin gene, intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (IGS), endopolygalacturonase pg1 and exopolygalacturonase pgx4 genes, and six microsatellite regions (four loci with repeat number variations and two loci with polymorphisms in flanking regions). In a previous study, race 3 of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris was reported to be Fusarium proliferatum based on TEF data of one isolate. However, our sequence analyses using TEF and other regions showed that the race 3 isolates in our study belong to F. oxysporum. The high degree of similarity among races supports a monophyletic origin of this forma specialis and a subsequent development of pathogenic races within the lineage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899978755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899978755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10658-014-0387-8

DO - 10.1007/s10658-014-0387-8

M3 - Article

VL - 139

SP - 303

EP - 318

JO - European Journal of Plant Pathology

JF - European Journal of Plant Pathology

SN - 0929-1873

IS - 2

ER -