Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation

Dino Ravnic, Moritz A. Konerding, Akira Tsuda, Harold T. Huss, Tanja Wolloscheck, Juan P. Pratt, Steven J. Mentzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Blood flowing across the vascular endothelium creates wall shear stress, dependent on velocity of flow and vessel geometry, that tends to disrupt lymphocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Objective: The microcirculation in a murine model of acute colitis was investigated to identify structural adaptations during acute colitis that may facilitate transmigration. Methods: In 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid-induced acute colitis, the infiltrating cells and colonic microcirculation was investigated by cellular topographic mapping, corrosion casting and three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Colonic blood velocimetry was performed using intravital microscopy. Results: Clinical and histological parameters suggested a peak inflammatory response at 96 h (p<0.001). The infiltrating cells were spatially related to the mucosal capillary plexus by three-dimensional topographic mapping (p<0.001). In normal mice, corrosion casting and three-dimensional SEM showed a polygonal mucosal plexus supplied by ascending arteries and descending veins. After 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid stimulation, three-dimensional SEM showed preserved branch angles (p = 0.52) and nominal vessel lengths (p = 0.93), but a significantly dilated mucosal capillary plexus (p<0.001). Intravital microscopy of the mucosal plexus showed a greater than twofold decrease in the velocity of flow (p<0.001). Conclusions: The demonstrable slowing of the velocity of flow despite an increase in volumetric flow suggests that these microvascular adaptations create conditions suitable for leucocyte adhesion and transmigration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-523
Number of pages6
JournalGut
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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Haptens
Corrosion Casting
Colitis
Microcirculation
Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Colon
Inflammation
Rheology
Vascular Endothelium
Cell Adhesion
Veins
Leukocytes
Endothelial Cells
Arteries
Lymphocytes
Intravital Microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Ravnic, D., Konerding, M. A., Tsuda, A., Huss, H. T., Wolloscheck, T., Pratt, J. P., & Mentzer, S. J. (2007). Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation. Gut, 56(4), 518-523. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2006.101824
Ravnic, Dino ; Konerding, Moritz A. ; Tsuda, Akira ; Huss, Harold T. ; Wolloscheck, Tanja ; Pratt, Juan P. ; Mentzer, Steven J. / Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation. In: Gut. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 4. pp. 518-523.
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abstract = "Background: Blood flowing across the vascular endothelium creates wall shear stress, dependent on velocity of flow and vessel geometry, that tends to disrupt lymphocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Objective: The microcirculation in a murine model of acute colitis was investigated to identify structural adaptations during acute colitis that may facilitate transmigration. Methods: In 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid-induced acute colitis, the infiltrating cells and colonic microcirculation was investigated by cellular topographic mapping, corrosion casting and three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Colonic blood velocimetry was performed using intravital microscopy. Results: Clinical and histological parameters suggested a peak inflammatory response at 96 h (p<0.001). The infiltrating cells were spatially related to the mucosal capillary plexus by three-dimensional topographic mapping (p<0.001). In normal mice, corrosion casting and three-dimensional SEM showed a polygonal mucosal plexus supplied by ascending arteries and descending veins. After 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid stimulation, three-dimensional SEM showed preserved branch angles (p = 0.52) and nominal vessel lengths (p = 0.93), but a significantly dilated mucosal capillary plexus (p<0.001). Intravital microscopy of the mucosal plexus showed a greater than twofold decrease in the velocity of flow (p<0.001). Conclusions: The demonstrable slowing of the velocity of flow despite an increase in volumetric flow suggests that these microvascular adaptations create conditions suitable for leucocyte adhesion and transmigration.",
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Ravnic, D, Konerding, MA, Tsuda, A, Huss, HT, Wolloscheck, T, Pratt, JP & Mentzer, SJ 2007, 'Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation', Gut, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 518-523. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2006.101824

Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation. / Ravnic, Dino; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira; Huss, Harold T.; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Pratt, Juan P.; Mentzer, Steven J.

In: Gut, Vol. 56, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 518-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Structural adaptations in the murine colon microcirculation associated with hapten-induced inflammation

AU - Ravnic, Dino

AU - Konerding, Moritz A.

AU - Tsuda, Akira

AU - Huss, Harold T.

AU - Wolloscheck, Tanja

AU - Pratt, Juan P.

AU - Mentzer, Steven J.

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N2 - Background: Blood flowing across the vascular endothelium creates wall shear stress, dependent on velocity of flow and vessel geometry, that tends to disrupt lymphocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Objective: The microcirculation in a murine model of acute colitis was investigated to identify structural adaptations during acute colitis that may facilitate transmigration. Methods: In 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid-induced acute colitis, the infiltrating cells and colonic microcirculation was investigated by cellular topographic mapping, corrosion casting and three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Colonic blood velocimetry was performed using intravital microscopy. Results: Clinical and histological parameters suggested a peak inflammatory response at 96 h (p<0.001). The infiltrating cells were spatially related to the mucosal capillary plexus by three-dimensional topographic mapping (p<0.001). In normal mice, corrosion casting and three-dimensional SEM showed a polygonal mucosal plexus supplied by ascending arteries and descending veins. After 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid stimulation, three-dimensional SEM showed preserved branch angles (p = 0.52) and nominal vessel lengths (p = 0.93), but a significantly dilated mucosal capillary plexus (p<0.001). Intravital microscopy of the mucosal plexus showed a greater than twofold decrease in the velocity of flow (p<0.001). Conclusions: The demonstrable slowing of the velocity of flow despite an increase in volumetric flow suggests that these microvascular adaptations create conditions suitable for leucocyte adhesion and transmigration.

AB - Background: Blood flowing across the vascular endothelium creates wall shear stress, dependent on velocity of flow and vessel geometry, that tends to disrupt lymphocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Objective: The microcirculation in a murine model of acute colitis was investigated to identify structural adaptations during acute colitis that may facilitate transmigration. Methods: In 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid-induced acute colitis, the infiltrating cells and colonic microcirculation was investigated by cellular topographic mapping, corrosion casting and three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Colonic blood velocimetry was performed using intravital microscopy. Results: Clinical and histological parameters suggested a peak inflammatory response at 96 h (p<0.001). The infiltrating cells were spatially related to the mucosal capillary plexus by three-dimensional topographic mapping (p<0.001). In normal mice, corrosion casting and three-dimensional SEM showed a polygonal mucosal plexus supplied by ascending arteries and descending veins. After 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid stimulation, three-dimensional SEM showed preserved branch angles (p = 0.52) and nominal vessel lengths (p = 0.93), but a significantly dilated mucosal capillary plexus (p<0.001). Intravital microscopy of the mucosal plexus showed a greater than twofold decrease in the velocity of flow (p<0.001). Conclusions: The demonstrable slowing of the velocity of flow despite an increase in volumetric flow suggests that these microvascular adaptations create conditions suitable for leucocyte adhesion and transmigration.

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