Structure and composition of selectively cut and uncut Abies-Tsuga forest in Wolong natural reserve and implications for Panda conservation in China

Alan H. Taylor, Qin Zisheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Giant pandas Ailuropoda melanoleuca David inhabit cool temperate, montane, and subalpine conifer forests with a bamboo understorey in Sichuan, Gansu, and Shaanxi provinces, China. Clearcutting of subalpine conifer forest in panda habitat stimulates vegetative growth of bamboos. This impedes tree regeneration and hardwoods dominate sites after clearcutting, with conifers rarely becoming established. This study assesses the effects of selective cutting on patterns of forest regeneration through analyses of the age and size structure of tree populations in selectively cut and uncut forest. Conifer regeneration after selective cutting was adequate to produce a forest similar in structure and composition to uncut subalpine conifer forest. A selective cutting regime in production forest with pandas would strike a balance between panda conservation and needs for wood products, and would contribute to management initiatives aimed at preserving existing panda populations outside the protection of natural reserves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-108
Number of pages26
JournalBiological Conservation
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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