Structured writing about stressful events: Exploring potential psychological mediators of positive health effects

Arthur A. Stone, Joshua Morrison Smyth, Alan Kaell, Adam Hurewitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a previous study, the authors found that structured writing about stressful events improved symptomatology in 112 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and asthma relative to patients who did not write (J. Smyth, A. Stone, A. Hurewitz, and A. Kaell, 1999). However, little is currently known about the pathways from the intervention to alterations in outcomes. In addition to measuring symptom outcomes after the intervention in the previous study, the authors monitored perceived stress, quality of sleep, affect, substance use, and medication use on a momentary basis for the 7 days prior to writing, during the 3 intervention days, and for the 14 days following the intervention (N = 105). These variables were tested in a secondary data analysis to determine whether they mediated the effects observed in the J. Smyth, A. Stone, et al. study. No evidence was found supporting mediation, and the mechanism underlying structured writing about stressful events remains unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-624
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Psychology
Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sleep
Asthma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Structured writing about stressful events : Exploring potential psychological mediators of positive health effects. / Stone, Arthur A.; Smyth, Joshua Morrison; Kaell, Alan; Hurewitz, Adam.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 619-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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